Graduate Course Catalog

Old Testament

OT 501 – Introduction to the Old Testament

  • Course Number: OT 501
  • Department: Old Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

The course will give an overview of the entire Old Testament, highlighting the authorship, themes, and historical context of each book. Included will be a brief study of the lives of the main men and women of the Old Testament world. This course uses the survey method of study. Here students will not only learn “about” the Old Testament, but also learn “how to study inductively.” Students will be guided through background information and other materials as they are encouraged to discover for themselves each of the Old Testament books.

OT 502 – Historical Geography of Israel

  • Course Number: OT 502
  • Department: Old Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

This course introduces the student to the geographical aspects of Israel as well as the historical/geographical backgrounds of the Biblical stories. The first half of the course focuses on the geography of the land of Israel. The second half focuses on significant Biblical events showing where they took place (creation through the journeys of Paul), including maps, and supporting archaeological finds.

OT 520 – The Pentateuch

  • Course Number: OT 520
  • Department: Old Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

This course is designed to introduce the student to the historical, literary, and theological interpretation of the Pentateuch. Individual assignments and readings will also draw attention to historical questions, hermeneutical challenges, and practical applications.

OT 525 – The Hebrew Prophets

  • Course Number: OT 525
  • Department: Old Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

This course chronologically reviews the biblical messages (“books”) of the Hebrew Prophets which were delivered in the eighth to fourth centuries BC. These messages comprise the major and minor prophetic sections of our Old Testament. Students will examine background information, selected themes, and literary structures for these books. They will have multiple opportunities to compare, contrast, and synthesize what the prophets said. The assignments also include present-day applications that grapple with the question, “What do the prophets still tell us today?”