Current Courses – Spring 2018

"It is hard to describe the feeling of accomplishment when I finally broke through in my Hebrew class and found I could read the original language." — Phil F., MDiv Alumni

Check individual program course options and work with your advisor to determine what courses are available for your program.

Undergraduate

  • Course Number: BL 302
  • Department: Biblical Languages
  • Units: 4
  • Level: Undergraduate

Biblical Hebrew 2 launches the student into a solid understanding of elementary biblical Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. It empowers the learner to read and translate elementary Hebrew texts. This 4-unit course runs 15 weeks and may take from 14-16 hours of study per week. The required textbook, Basics of Biblical Hebrew by Drs. Gary D. Practico and Miles V. Van Pelt, balances grammatical and deductive instruction with exercises in reading and translation. This method provides some immediate gratification to the student for his or her hard work in learning the rules of grammar, syntax and morphology.

  • Course Number: BL 304
  • Department: Biblical Languages
  • Units: 4
  • Level: Undergraduate

The goal of Greek I and II is to equip students with a basic working knowledge of the Koine Greek. An understanding of Biblical Greek will be a valuable tool in your personal study of God’s word in your ministry. The course will present an introduction to Koine Greek, with an emphasis on grammar, syntax, and vocabulary as used in the New Testament. Introduction to Biblical Greek is a 2 trimester course. Both trimesters are required to be taken consecutively.

  • Course Number: CH 301
  • Department: Church History
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Survey of Church History surveys the history of the Christian Church from the Apostolic Age to the present. The student will learn about the key persons, issues, and events of each age of the church; discover the impact these persons and events had on each other; and identify their impact on the church of today. In addition, the student will examine the influence of the Holy Spirit in the history of the Christian Church.

  • Course Number: FL 206
  • Department: Foreign Language
  • Units: 4
  • Level: Undergraduate

Portuguese is spoken by one fifth of the world’s population. The primary goal of this course is to enable students to become conversational in Portuguese. Students will learn around 950 words and be able to use them in conversation. They will also be able to read Portuguese. This course uses English grammatical concepts to show how Portuguese fits into those concepts. Studying grammar will enable the student to form sentences in Portuguese. The order of the material presented is similar to how a Brazilian child learns to speak.

  • Course Number: GS 111
  • Department: General Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

In English Composition 2 the student will write thesis-centered essays with clear support, using a variety of rhetorical modes. The class will culminate with a research paper and also work on developing their critical thinking and reading skills.

  • Course Number: HI 201
  • Department: History
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Western Civilization 1 will cover history from the western perspective beginning with the first civilizations up to 1740 A.D. It will focus on the interactions of people and countries and how their interactions were influenced by their understanding of God. It will also explore the advancements in life, technology, and science, and how these advancements caused changes in society, in government, conflicts between nations, and periodically war.

  • Course Number: HI 220
  • Department: History
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

World Religions provides an introduction to the academic study of major teachings, beliefs and devotional practices of religions around the world. Students will develop the ability to think critically about conflicting religious claims and gain knowledge of the history and culture of several major religious traditions. The course also deals with some of the essential differences and similarities which exist among each religious tradition, and points to the uniqueness of each of them.

  • Course Number: MM 401
  • Department: Mentored Field Ministry
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

The Mentored Ministry course provides an apprenticeship experience for students to serve in a focused area of ministry. They will interact with a mentor who will direct, encourage and evaluate their activities as they minister in real life situations. This training allows for students to apply what they have learned at the University, and to draw on the principles taught in their biblical, theological, and ministry practices studies. The students will explore and write about the practice of mentoring in the Scriptures. The students will also write a paper that reflects on their mentoring experience, and on what they have learned in their studies.

  • Course Number: MT 301
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Spiritual Formation presents a study of various spiritual disciplines that help foster the spiritual formation of a Christian believer. Each discipline will be studied through the lens of the Scriptures, the course textbook by Foster, Celebration of Discipline, and readings by John Robert Stevens whose ministry has a strong emphasis on spiritual formation. Readings from other scholars are required also. While disciplines in themselves are not an end result, they can facilitate an exposure to God that brings transformation and spiritual maturity.

  • Course Number: MT 311
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

This course is a scriptural approach to ministering personal change and growth. The student will be presented with a scriptural basis for reaching the depths of the heart and addressing the roots that cause people’s issues to remain “unresolved.” This course will cover examples and application of key principles of spiritual counsel, as well as the outcomes of exercising these principles – healing, deliverance, growth, and maturity. The course will include a study of legal safeguards.

  • Course Number: NT 301
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Introduction to the New Testament is a study of the background, content, and basic themes presented in the New Testament documents. Our purpose is come to an understanding of the message of the New Testament that will provide a basis for personal growth and an ability to explain the Scriptures to others. We will become familiar with the main themes of each of the books of the New Testament. In addition, woven into the class is our study of important background issues, theological themes, and critical issues, such as the authorship, dating, and integrity of New Testament documents.

  • Course Number: NT 310
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

The Formation of the New Testament is a course that will introduce the student to the literary background of New Testament times, present an understanding of the Bible as the Word of God, and give an overview of the Old and New Testaments and how they fit together as a unified book. The course will cover the various forms of biblical/textual criticism, and the process that took place to choose which books got into the New Testament canon and which ones were rejected. The student will discover how the books of the Bible came together in the form recognized today.

  • Course Number: PL 401
  • Department: Pastoral Leadership
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Liturgy consists of the practices of a church for public worship. The student will gain a comprehensive view of the scriptural principles involved in Christian liturgical practices historically and today. The course begins with a study of the New Testament Church gatherings. Using Old Testament examples and New Testament teaching, the student will analyze the basic elements of church gatherings, as well as principles and keys for leading congregants in a service. The student will be provided with practical, Spirit-led guidelines. Students are coached in simple applications of these principles. These topics are studied primarily via the lens of the Scriptures, the course textbooks, and readings from John Robert Stevens.

  • Course Number: SC 202
  • Department: Science
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Introduction to Health Science is a unique new approach to studying the foundations of health, which includes the study of food and lifestyle. Our health is strongly correlated with what we eat, the quality of our food, and how we live. Lessons include compelling media presentations that support what is being taught, all within the context of cutting-edge science and concepts on the frontier of health research. We will journey through food addiction, food’s influence on our genetics, the global war over food supplies, sustainable farming, a new approach to chronic disease, and other important topics. This course is just the beginning of a search for the truth about diet, lifestyle, healing, and disease. You should leave this class empowered to make significant changes in your lifestyle. To life!

  • Course Number: TH 301
  • Department: Theology
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Theology 1 introduces students to theological thinking that begins in the life of God, witnessed to in the Bible, and articulated in the life and ministry of Jesus Christ as sent from His Father. We will discuss the nature of humanity created in God’s image, but afflicted with sin and needing God’s restorative work. The student will learn to think out of the life of God witnessed to in the Bible and made evident in the revelation of Jesus Christ, as well as to discern inadequate presentations, all in order to serve God in the life of the church and world.

Graduate

  • Course Number: BL 502
  • Department: Biblical Languages
  • Units: 4
  • Level: Graduate

Biblical Hebrew 2 launches the student into a solid understanding of elementary biblical Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. It empowers the learner to read and translate elementary Hebrew texts. This 4-unit course runs 15 weeks and may take from 14-16 hours of study per week. The required textbook, Basics of Biblical Hebrew by Drs. Gary D. Practico and Miles V. Van Pelt, balances grammatical and deductive instruction with exercises in reading and translation. This method provides some immediate gratification to the student for his or her hard work in learning the rules of grammar, syntax and morphology.

  • Course Number: BL 504
  • Department: Biblical Languages
  • Units: 4
  • Level: Graduate

The goal of Greek I and II is to equip students with a basic working knowledge of the Koine Greek. An understanding of Biblical Greek will be a valuable tool in your personal study of God’s word in your ministry. The course will present an introduction to Koine Greek, with an emphasis on grammar, syntax, and vocabulary as used in the New Testament. Introduction to Biblical Greek is a 2 trimester course. Both trimesters are required to be taken consecutively.

  • Course Number: CH 501
  • Department: Church History
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Survey of Church History surveys the history of the Christian Church from the Apostolic Age to the present. The student will learn about the key persons, issues, and events of each age of the church; discover the impact these persons and events had on each other; and identify their impact on the church of today. In addition, the student will examine the influence of the Holy Spirit in the history of the Christian Church.

  • Course Number: FL 506
  • Department: Foreign Language
  • Units: 4
  • Level: Graduate

Portuguese is spoken by one fifth of the world’s population. The primary goal of this course is to enable students to become conversational in Portuguese. Students will learn around 950 words and be able to use them in conversation. They will also be able to read Portuguese. This course uses English grammatical concepts to show how Portuguese fits into those concepts. Studying grammar will enable the student to form sentences in Portuguese. The order of the material presented is similar to how a Brazilian child learns to speak.

  • Course Number: MM 501
  • Department: Mentored Field Ministry
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

The Mentored Ministry course provides an apprenticeship experience for students to serve in a focused area of ministry. They will interact with a mentor who will direct, encourage and evaluate their activities as they minister in real life situations. This training allows for students to apply what they have learned at the University, and to draw on the principles taught in their biblical, theological, and ministry practices studies. The students will explore and write about the practice of mentoring in the Scriptures. The students will also write a paper that reflects on their mentoring experience, and on what they have learned in their studies.

  • Course Number: MT 501
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Spiritual Formation presents a study of various spiritual disciplines that help foster the spiritual formation of a Christian believer. Each discipline will be studied through the lens of the Scriptures, the course textbook by Foster, Celebration of Discipline, and readings by John Robert Stevens whose ministry has a strong emphasis on spiritual formation. Readings from other scholars are required also. While disciplines in themselves are not an end result, they can facilitate an exposure to God that brings transformation and spiritual maturity.

  • Course Number: MT 511
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

This course is a scriptural approach to ministering personal change and growth. The student will be presented with a scriptural basis for reaching the depths of the heart and addressing the roots that cause people’s issues to remain “unresolved.” This course will cover examples and application of key principles of spiritual counsel, as well as, the outcomes of exercising these principles – healing, deliverance, growth, and maturity. The course will include a study of legal safeguards.

  • Course Number: NT 501
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Introduction to the New Testament is a study of the background, content, and basic themes presented in the New Testament documents. Our purpose is come to an understanding of the message of the New Testament that will provide a basis for personal growth and an ability to explain the Scriptures to others. We will become familiar with the main themes of each of the books of the New Testament. In addition, woven into the class is our study of important background issues, theological themes, and critical issues, such as the authorship, dating, and integrity of New Testament documents.

  • Course Number: PL 501
  • Department: Pastoral Leadership
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Liturgy consists of the practices of a church for public worship. The student will gain a comprehensive view of the scriptural principles involved in Christian liturgical practices historically and today. The course begins with a study of the New Testament Church gatherings. Using Old Testament examples and New Testament teaching, the student will analyze the basic elements of church gatherings, as well as principles and keys for leading congregants in a service. The student will be provided with practical, Spirit-led guidelines. Students are coached in simple applications of these principles. These topics are studied primarily via the lens of the Scriptures, the course textbooks, and readings from John Robert Stevens.

  • Course Number: Th 501
  • Department: Theology
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Theology 1 introduces students to theological thinking that begins in the life of God, witnessed to in the Bible, and articulated in the life and ministry of Jesus Christ as sent from His Father. We will discuss the nature of humanity created in God’s image, but afflicted with sin and needing God’s restorative work. The student will learn to think out of the life of God witnessed to in the Bible and made evident in the revelation of Jesus Christ, as well as to discern inadequate presentations, all in order to serve God in the life of the church and world.

Doctoral

  • Course Number: DM 711
  • Department: Doctoral
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Doctoral

Relational Theology provides the resources and unfolding logic of the relational nature of theology and the resulting implications for the life of the Church. The relational mode of thinking arises out of the being and activity of God in the world. The participants will explore how this informs the life of the Church in its worship and mission. They will distinguish a theological understanding of being persons to inform their ministry in order to engage the whole of life in the network of their relations.

  • Course Number: DM 723
  • Department: Doctoral
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Doctoral

Ministry of Healing and Reconciliation addresses current issues that face the Church today. This seminar engages pastors in practical means by which they can facilitate ministry to the victims of injustice, racial harmony, and social justice in their church and community. In a world of separatism, sectarianism, and secularism, this seminar will examine the Church’s call to reconciliation. Given that people are both sinners and victims of sin and injustice, this seminar theologically addresses the sinned against, discusses the ways in which the Holy Spirit ministers healing and justice, and offers practical tools that will help pastors to compassionately minister to the unique pastoral care needs of the sinned against within the context of a safe and healing church community.

  • Course Number: DM 766
  • Department: Doctoral
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Doctoral

This seminar will focus on the dynamics of leading and managing healthy, growing churches. Participants will explore various facets of church leadership and management, with special emphasis on implementing practical strategies. Proven ways to empower people and guide their ministries into greater effectiveness will be explored.

  • Course Number: DM 791
  • Department: Doctoral
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Doctoral

The pre-research clinic is conducted at the start of the first year of the DMIN experience. It provides instruction for researching and writing of the Professional Ministry Research Project. The pre-research clinic involves preparation for the submitting of a Concept Paper for project committee evaluation. Later, in DMIN790, this Concept Paper will be expanded into a Project Proposal. During clinic the Concept Paper is offered to the peer group for input and evaluation. Pre-research clinic includes instruction in project development, applied research methods, and project proposal writing.