Current Courses – Summer 2017

"It is hard to describe the feeling of accomplishment when I finally broke through in my Hebrew class and found I could read the original language." — Phil F., MDiv Alumni

Check individual program course options and work with your advisor to determine what courses are available for your program.

Undergraduate

  • Course Number: BS 308
  • Department: Business / Management
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Introduction to Business Applications provides an introduction to the rapidly evolving world of information technology. Topics include technology’s impact on the world, personal computing, using the internet, software applications, operating systems, hardware, managing digital devices, database systems, and networking. Secure and ethical use of technology is emphasized.

  • Course Number: CH 402
  • Department: Church History
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Readings in Christian Thought spans from the New Testament era to the present. It is a study of fundamental Christian doctrines, how they began, and how they evolved into modern theological thought. The course will include an in-depth study of the theologians who developed these doctrines, beginning with the post-apostolic fathers and ending with modern theologians up to the current day. In addition, the students will have an opportunity to examine their own theology and discover the sources of some of their own thinking and beliefs. One goal of this course is to help the students understand and articulate how these doctrines enable Christians of all faiths to come together and speak a common language.

  • Course Number: HU 204
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Music Theory and Musicianship 2 will build on the knowledge acquired in the first music theory trimester class, i.e. the student’s ability to recognize and analyze both visually and aurally the building blocks of Common Practice musical compositions. This class will begin to put these building blocks together by covering the whys, hows, and wherefores of four-part vocal writing, and putting pencil to paper to master the rules of contrapuntal writing. The student will continue to work on ear training skills, sight singing, notating ever more complex rhythmic and melodic dictations, and aurally recognizing and describing the constituent parts of a variety of musical compositions.

  • Course Number: HU 210
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Introduction to Literature introduces students to the literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama while acquainting them with theoretical tools and frameworks for interpreting literature. We will also identify and analyze central elements of each literary genre, and discuss the importance of literature as a unique means of comprehending and conveying human experience, past and present.

  • Course Number: HU 211
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

The Shiloh University “Reading the Bible” class gives the student the opportunity to read through the Bible from Genesis to Revelation with minimal focus on doctrine or detailed analysis. The primary text for this course is the Bible. However, Ryken’s Bible Handbook by Leland Ryken, Philip Ryken, and James Wilhoit provides background for each of the Bible books and give tips for reading. Ryken’s Handbook also adds an extra dimension to the course by highlighting the variety of literary genres used in the scriptures.

  • Course Number: HU 231
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Philosophy of Religion is designed, not to teach “correct” religious doctrine, but to give students the ability to examine their beliefs in the light of logic and critical thinking. The students will examine ideas such as the concept of God, the existence of God, believing in God, the problem of evil, God’s omniscience and omnipotence, miracles, and other similar issues. The ultimate purpose is to provide each student with the tools necessary to be able to respond intelligently and logically to challenges to their faith. In a walk with God, it is important to have an answer to everyone who asks.

  • Course Number: MM 401
  • Department: Mentored Field Ministry
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

The Mentored Ministry course provides an apprenticeship experience for students to serve in a focused area of ministry. They will interact with a mentor who will direct, encourage and evaluate their activities as they minister in real life situations. This training allows for students to apply what they have learned at the University, and to draw on the principles taught in their biblical, theological, and ministry practices studies. The students will explore and write about the practice of mentoring in the Scriptures. The students will also write a paper that reflects on their mentoring experience, and on what they have learned in their studies.

  • Course Number: MT 309
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Missions and Evangelism offers a dual focus. It begins with a study of how the Great Commission (Matt. 28:16-20) to the Christian Church has been viewed and fulfilled throughout history. This course covers a broad sweep of missionary and evangelistic outreach in church history, from the Early Church to modern day churches. For several weeks it focuses on missionary-eras and particularly on the life and work of specific missionaries and evangelists. The course concludes with a series of studies concerning the necessity for and practicalities of evangelism. Through these studies, students are guided to find their belief and expression in fulfilling the Great Commission in this day.

  • Course Number: MT 407
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Biblical Hermeneutics is the study of the process of interpreting the Bible. The student will study and practice the use of historical context, cultural context, literary context, and biblical context, as well as the role of original languages in the interpretation of the Bible. The student will also be introduced to the history of biblical hermeneutics and other contemporary approaches to the subject.

  • Course Number: NT 312
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

This comprehensive course immerses the learner in the richness of the Biblical calendar of major Jewish feasts, holy days, celebrations, and the Jewish way of life. This Biblical calendar was originally mandated by God, described in the Hebrew Scriptures, and observed by Jews since antiquity. Two thousand years of creative rabbinical understanding and the developments of additional practiced customs, traditions, and rituals associated with each of these significant Jewish holy days, feasts, and celebrations are closely studied. The proper noting of the traditional ways and means of Jewish celebration are respectfully examined and explained in detail. Each holy day is likewise studied for its manner of contemporary celebrations of Jewish communities around the world and especially in the State of Israel.

  • Course Number: NT 424
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

This course introduces the student to the life, letters, and theology of Paul and to significant arguments, theories, and paradigms in the history of Pauline scholarship. The goal is to equip the student with interpretive tools that help him or her read the letters of Paul with understanding and profit.

  • Course Number: OT 302
  • Department: Old Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

This course introduces the student to the geographical aspects of Israel as well as the historical/geographical backgrounds of the Biblical stories. The first half of the course focuses on the geography of the land of Israel. The second half focuses on significant Biblical events showing where they took place (creation through the journeys of Paul), including maps, and supporting archaeological finds.

  • Course Number: PL 410
  • Department: Pastoral Leadership
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Stewardship and Administration will guide the student through an analysis of the qualities of an effective leader and the requirement of faithful stewardship in the church. Topics covered in this course include leadership, delegation, administration, stewardship, church finances, church records, and risk management.

  • Course Number: SC 203
  • Department: Science
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Environmental Science will delve into topics such as environmental ethics, environment stewardship, pesticide use and organic farming, climate change, waste and pollution management, alternative energy, and much more.

  • Course Number: TH 302
  • Department: Theology
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Theology 2 presents a thorough introductory study of three core doctrines: 1) the application of redemption, 2) the Church, 3) the future. The student will examine the biblical bases for the doctrines, clarify the position held in the text, and analyze variant understandings of the concepts with measured reason. The student will be able to interpret, explain and appraise these major doctrines. Finally the student will make personal application of their increased understanding of the scriptural doctrines.

Graduate

  • Course Number: CH 502
  • Department: Church History
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Readings in Christian Thought spans from the New Testament era to the present. It is a study of fundamental Christian doctrines, how they began, and how they evolved into modern theological thought. The course will include an in-depth study of the theologians who developed these doctrines, beginning with the post-apostolic fathers and ending with modern theologians up to the current day. In addition, the students will have an opportunity to examine their own theology and discover the sources of some of their own thinking and beliefs. One goal of this course is to help the students understand and articulate how these doctrines enable Christians of all faiths to come together and speak a common language.

  • Course Number: GS 501
  • Department: General Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Theological Research and Writing will prepare students for research and writing requirements of future Shiloh University course work. It will instruct students in the categories of biblical and theological resources, and how to utilize EndNote in cataloging resources. The students will learn various types and approaches to biblical and theological research, and the process of writing a research paper. The course includes a review of basic grammar in preparation for future studies in the biblical languages and the process of biblical exegesis.

  • Course Number: MM 501
  • Department: Mentored Field Ministry
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

The Mentored Ministry course provides an apprenticeship experience for students to serve in a focused area of ministry. They will interact with a mentor who will direct, encourage and evaluate their activities as they minister in real life situations. This training allows for students to apply what they have learned at the University, and to draw on the principles taught in their biblical, theological, and ministry practices studies. The students will explore and write about the practice of mentoring in the Scriptures. The students will also write a paper that reflects on their mentoring experience, and on what they have learned in their studies.

  • Course Number: MT 507
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Biblical Hermeneutics is the study of the process of interpreting the Bible. The student will study and practice the use of historical context, cultural context, literary context, and biblical context, as well as the role of original languages in the interpretation of the Bible. The student will also be introduced to the history of biblical hermeneutics and other contemporary approaches to the subject.

  • Course Number: MT 509
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Missions and Evangelism offers a dual focus. It begins with a study of how the Great Commission (Matt. 28:16-20) to the Christian Church has been viewed and fulfilled throughout history. This course covers a broad sweep of missionary and evangelistic outreach in church history, from the Early Church to modern day churches. For several weeks it focuses on missionary-eras and particularly on the life and work of specific missionaries and evangelists. The course concludes with a series of studies concerning the necessity for and practicalities of evangelism. Through these studies, students are guided to find their belief and expression in fulfilling the Great Commission in this day.

  • Course Number: NT 524
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

This course introduces the student to the life, letters, and theology of Paul and to significant arguments, theories, and paradigms in the history of Pauline scholarship. The goal is to equip the student with interpretive tools that help him or her read the letters of Paul with understanding and profit.

  • Course Number: OT 502
  • Department: Old Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

This course introduces the student to the geographical aspects of Israel as well as the historical/geographical backgrounds of the Biblical stories. The first half of the course focuses on the geography of the land of Israel. The second half focuses on significant Biblical events showing where they took place (creation through the journeys of Paul), including maps, and supporting archaeological finds.

  • Course Number: PL 510
  • Department: Pastoral Leadership
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Stewardship and Administration will guide the student through an analysis of the qualities of an effective leader and the requirement of faithful stewardship in the church. Topics covered in this course include leadership, delegation, administration, stewardship, church finances, church records, and risk management.

  • Course Number: TH 502
  • Department: Theology
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Theology 2 presents a thorough introductory study of three core doctrines: 1) the application of redemption, 2) the Church, 3) the future. The student will examine the biblical bases for the doctrines, clarify the position held in the text, and analyze variant understandings of the concepts with measured reason. The student will be able to interpret, explain and appraise these major doctrines. Finally the student will make personal application of their increased understanding of the scriptural doctrines.

Doctoral

  • Course Number: DM 722
  • Department: Doctoral
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Doctoral

Proclaiming God’s Goodness Across Cultures examines the classic “problem of evil” faced in every ministry setting which asks the question “if God is all-loving and all-powerful, why is there evil and suffering in the world?” The problem is examined through the lens of the metanarrative of Scripture, and a theodicy based in relationship is developed accordingly. The seminar equips the participant with an understanding of the underlying theological, sociological and communication skills necessary to identify and confront the problem of evil in a variety of ministry and cultural settings at home and abroad.

  • Course Number: DM 751
  • Department: Doctoral
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Doctoral

Contemporary Trends in Worship provides a theology and sets the understanding for biblical worship in the life of the believer, which has at its beginning point a Trinitarian understanding of God. There have been significant changes in worship practice in the last decades in the Western Church. This seminar will seek to analyze and identify these trends through the lens of Relational Theology and its resulting implications in the life of the believer, especially in regard to their union with Christ. The major issues of theology are discussed in terms of understanding who Christ is.