Current Courses – Summer 2020

Check individual program course options and work with your advisor to determine what courses are available for your program.

Undergraduate

  • Course Number: HU 204
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Music Theory and Musicianship 2 will build on the knowledge acquired in the first music theory trimester class, i.e. the student’s ability to recognize and analyze both visually and aurally the building blocks of Common Practice musical compositions. This class will begin to put these building blocks together by covering the whys, hows, and wherefores of four-part vocal writing, and putting pencil to paper to master the rules of contrapuntal writing. The student will continue to work on ear training skills, sight singing, notating ever more complex rhythmic and melodic dictations, and aurally recognizing and describing the constituent parts of a variety of musical compositions.

  • Course Number: HU 210
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Introduction to Literature introduces students to the literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama while acquainting them with theoretical tools and frameworks for interpreting literature. We will also identify and analyze central elements of each literary genre, and discuss the importance of literature as a unique means of comprehending and conveying human experience, past and present.

  • Course Number: MM 401
  • Department: Mentored Field Ministry
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

The Mentored Ministry course provides an apprenticeship experience for students to serve in a focused area of ministry. They will interact with a mentor who will direct, encourage and evaluate their activities as they minister in real life situations. This training allows for students to apply what they have learned at the University, and to draw on the principles taught in their biblical, theological, and ministry practices studies. The students will explore and write about the practice of mentoring in the Scriptures. The students will also write a paper that reflects on their mentoring experience, and on what they have learned in their studies.

  • Course Number: MT 309
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Missions and Evangelism offers a dual focus. It begins with a study of how the Great Commission (Matt. 28:16-20) to the Christian Church has been viewed and fulfilled throughout history. This course covers a broad sweep of missionary and evangelistic outreach in church history, from the Early Church to modern day churches. For several weeks it focuses on missionary-eras and particularly on the life and work of specific missionaries and evangelists. The course concludes with a series of studies concerning the necessity for and practicalities of evangelism. Through these studies, students are guided to find their belief and expression in fulfilling the Great Commission in this day.

  • Course Number: MT 313
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Practical Crisis Counseling will present some of the basic historical, theological, spiritual, and practical foundations for crisis counseling. The functional, pragmatic, and philosophical aspects of crisis counseling will be covered as well. This class will be focused on the practical application of learned principles and behavior in the participant’s unique situations. The goal is that students will gain real-life application in local church and other ministry settings.

  • Course Number: MT 407
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Biblical Hermeneutics is the study of the process of interpreting the Bible. The course will survey the historical movements and contemporary approaches in biblical hermeneutics, the levels of meaning of a biblical passage, and the role of the Holy Spirit in biblical interpretation. The student will gain an appreciation for the study of the Bible through a relational theological lens. The student will also apply the hermeneutical principles learned in the class to a passage of Scripture.

  • Course Number: NT 310
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

The Formation of the New Testament is a course that will introduce the student to the literary background of New Testament times, present an understanding of the Bible as the Word of God, and give an overview of the Old and New Testaments and how they fit together as a unified book. The course will cover the various forms of biblical/textual criticism, and the process that took place to choose which books got into the New Testament canon and which ones were rejected. The student will discover how the books of the Bible came together in the form recognized today.

  • Course Number: NT 424
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

The Life and Letters of Paul introduces the student to the life, letters, and theology of the apostle Paul. The basic contours of Paul’s life will be studied to help better frame his writings and theology. Each of Paul’s letters will be examined in light of historical context/issues that assist in the interpretation of the letter.

  • Course Number: OT 302
  • Department: Old Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

In Historical Geography of Israel the students will learn about the geographic regions of Israel and how the geography affected the lives of peoples who lived there in biblical times. The student will study the context of the surrounding regions and civilizations that played a huge role in the history of the Promised Land. There will also be opportunity to apply historical and geographical information to selected biblical texts and stories.

  • Course Number: SC 203
  • Department: Science
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Environmental Science will delve into topics such as environmental ethics, environment stewardship, pesticide use and organic farming, climate change, waste and pollution management, alternative energy, and much more.

  • Course Number: SS 202
  • Department: Social Science
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Principles of Interpersonal Relationships teaches a holistic, integrated, principle-centered approach for a student’s personal and professional life. Universal principles such as fairness, personal integrity, honesty, and human dignity, provide the foundation for effective interpersonal relationships. Students will be introduced to quality life habits and have the opportunity to internalize them through personal exercise, video presentations, Scriptures and spiritual teaching.

  • Course Number: TH 302
  • Department: Theology
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Theology 2 presents a thorough introductory study of three core doctrines: 1) the application of redemption, 2) the Church, 3) the future. The student will examine the biblical bases for the doctrines, clarify the position held in the text, and analyze variant understandings of the concepts with measured reason. The student will be able to interpret, explain and appraise these major doctrines. Finally the student will make personal application of their increased understanding of the scriptural doctrines.

Graduate

  • Course Number: MM 501
  • Department: Mentored Field Ministry
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

The Mentored Ministry course provides an apprenticeship experience for students to serve in a focused area of ministry. They will interact with a mentor who will direct, encourage and evaluate their activities as they minister in real life situations. This training allows for students to apply what they have learned at the University, and to draw on the principles taught in their biblical, theological, and ministry practices studies. The students will explore and write about the practice of mentoring in the Scriptures. The students will also write a paper that reflects on their mentoring experience, and on what they have learned in their studies.

  • Course Number: MT 507
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Biblical Hermeneutics is the study of the process of interpreting the Bible. The course will survey the historical movements and contemporary approaches in biblical hermeneutics, the levels of meaning of a biblical passage, and the role of the Holy Spirit in biblical interpretation. The student will gain an appreciation for the study of the Bible through a relational theological lens. The student will also apply the hermeneutical principles learned in the class to a passage of Scripture.

  • Course Number: MT 509
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Missions and Evangelism offers a dual focus. It begins with a study of how the Great Commission (Matt. 28:16-20) to the Christian Church has been viewed and fulfilled throughout history. This course covers a broad sweep of missionary and evangelistic outreach in church history, from the Early Church to modern day churches. For several weeks it focuses on missionary-eras and particularly on the life and work of specific missionaries and evangelists. The course concludes with a series of studies concerning the necessity for and practicalities of evangelism. Through these studies, students are guided to find their belief and expression in fulfilling the Great Commission in this day.

  • Course Number: MT 513
  • Department: Ministry Studies
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Practical Crisis Counseling will present some of the basic historical, theological, spiritual, and practical foundations for crisis counseling. The functional, pragmatic, and philosophical aspects of crisis counseling will be covered as well. This class will be focused on the practical application of learned principles and behavior in the participant’s unique situations. The goal is that students will gain real-life application in local church and other ministry settings.

  • Course Number: NT 524
  • Department: New Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

The Life and Letters of Paul introduces the student to the life, letters, and theology of the apostle Paul. The basic contours of Paul’s life will be studied to help better frame his writings and theology. Each of Paul’s letters will be examined in the light of historical context/issues that assist in the interpretation of the letter.

  • Course Number: OT 502
  • Department: Old Testament
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

In Historical Geography of Israel the students will learn about the geographic regions of Israel and how the geography affected the lives of peoples who lived there in biblical times. The student will study the context of the surrounding regions and civilizations that played a huge role in the history of the Promised Land. There will also be opportunity to apply historical and geographical information to selected biblical texts and stories.

  • Course Number: TH 502
  • Department: Theology
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Graduate

Theology 2 presents a thorough introductory study of three core doctrines: 1) the application of redemption, 2) the Church, 3) the future. The student will examine the biblical bases for the doctrines, clarify the position held in the text, and analyze variant understandings of the concepts with measured reason. The student will be able to interpret, explain and appraise these major doctrines. Finally the student will make personal application of their increased understanding of the scriptural doctrines.

Doctoral

  • Course Number: DM 792
  • Department: Doctoral
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Doctoral

This seminar provides instruction for the researching and writing of the DMIN applied research project. The candidate will expand the Concept Paper into a Proposal. This seminar includes intensive analysis. The student will present and defend a viable project proposal for official and peer review. Candidacy is granted upon satisfactory completion.

  • Course Number: DM 796
  • Department: Doctoral
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Doctoral

Based on an approved project proposal, the candidate will research and write a ministry project that relates to a significant aspect of the ministry in which he/she is involved. Ministry Research Project is a one-year seminar with set milestones for timely completion of the project. Regular cohort discussions and faculty interaction is included during the participant’s research project work. To earn credit the candidate must complete a successful oral defense. The candidate is assigned an individual faculty advisor for the project.