Undergraduate Course Catalog

Humanities

HU 201 – History of Music in the Church

  • Course Number: HU 201
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

History of Music in the Church will examine how our ancestors of faith in both the Old and New Testaments used music in their worship. We will research how music of the early church would have been adapted to the times of extreme persecution and then evolved after the 4th century when the melodies we call chant were finally collected, codified, and franchised to the churches in the 4th and 5th centuries. We will study the sources of single melody chants in the liturgy of the Mass; trace its evolution into two, three, and even more melodies being sung simultaneously; and look at the beginnings of music notation.  Students will explore the musical diversities created by the Reformation and Counter-Reformation: from the Lutheran Chorales to metrical psalm setting; from the cantatas of Bach to English hymn settings; from the oratorios of Handel to spirituals and revival tunes; and from the organ musings of Olivier Messiaen to the pop/rock influenced praise music of today.  We will also touch on the music used in the churches of the Near East, Russia and Africa. Assigned listening examples corresponding with each week’s readings provide musical context, and, of course, students will learn and employ the vocabulary needed to describe and discuss the Church’s music used throughout the ages.

HU 202 – Introduction to World Music

  • Course Number: HU 202
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Introduction to World Music provides an introduction to various styles, organizational patterns, and other topics related to understanding music across the globe. Students will learn to identify and gain an appreciation for the music of many countries. This course will provide students with the opportunity to practice and apply valuable critical listening and effective analyzing skills.

HU 203 – Music Theory and Musicianship 1

  • Course Number: HU 203
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Music Theory and Musicianship 1 is for everyone who desires the ability to decipher both the written and auditory worlds of music. Because it covers everything from basic pitch and rhythmic notation to diatonic and secondary 7th chords, the guitar player will gain insight into the “whys” and “hows’ of chord construction. The pianist will gain the confidence to leave the constriction of the written page and soar into the world of improvisation. Vocalists will build a foundation of invaluable musicianship skills. Indeed, all instrumentalists will benefit from an awareness of their part in triadic harmony.

HU 204 – Music Theory and Musicianship 2

  • Course Number: HU 204
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Music Theory and Musicianship 2 will build on the knowledge acquired in the first music theory trimester class, i.e. the student’s ability to recognize and analyze both visually and aurally the building blocks of Common Practice musical compositions. This class will begin to put these building blocks together by covering the whys, hows, and wherefores of four-part vocal writing, and putting pencil to paper to master the rules of contrapuntal writing. The student will continue to work on ear training skills, sight singing, notating ever more complex rhythmic and melodic dictations, and aurally recognizing and describing the constituent parts of a variety of musical compositions.

HU 210 – Introduction to Literature

  • Course Number: HU 210
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

Introduction to Literature introduces students to the literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama while acquainting them with theoretical tools and frameworks for interpreting literature. We will also identify and analyze central elements of each literary genre, and discuss the importance of literature as a unique means of comprehending and conveying human experience, past and present.

HU 211 – Reading the Bible as Literature

  • Course Number: HU 211
  • Department: Humanities
  • Units: 3
  • Level: Undergraduate

The Shiloh University “Reading the Bible” class gives the student the opportunity to read through the Bible from Genesis to Revelation with minimal focus on doctrine or detailed analysis. The primary text for this course is the Bible. However, Ryken’s Bible Handbook by Leland Ryken, Philip Ryken, and James Wilhoit provides background for each of the Bible books and give tips for reading. Ryken’s Handbook also adds an extra dimension to the course by highlighting the variety of literary genres used in the scriptures.